Arizona Grand Resort, Phoenix, AZ : Oct 5-7, 2008

Best Practices

This year’s Enterprise Architect Summit is shaping up to be yet another great event. Here is a sampling of the first-announced sessions that you will experience at the 2008 Enterprise Architect Summit.

Monday, October 6, 2008

10:30 a.m.

Extending SOA to the Desktop

Francis Carden

While Service Orientated Architectures (SOA) offer a number of benefits to IT organizations, very few enterprise business users have benefited yet. Why?  Partly because SOA projects tend to be long journeys instead of iterative short projects. Also, because new services are typically delivered to users as part of new Web portals or rich internet applications. Unfortunately, these new applications rarely replace or integrate with applications that exist on a users’ desktop. In effect, SOA is further complicating an already complex desktop environment; adding yet another siloed application to the mix.

This presentation will highlight a technology approach that leverages the Windows Communications Foundation (WCF) within the .NET Framework v3.5 to enable rapid integration between legacy applications, including desktop applications, and Web services.

11:45 a.m.

A Complete Approach to SOA Success

Peter Herzum, President, Herzum Software

How is SOA being adopted in leading companies to reduce their integration costs, support the establishment of adaptive enterprise-wide architectures, and improve alignment between IT and business? This intensive session provides a comprehensive approach to success with SOA.

Based on direct experience working with medium and large companies, and using frequent real-world examples, the session provides a the state-of-the-art concepts, technologies, best practices, architectural aspects, and processes for SOA. It also provides a hard look at critical success factors and typical pitfalls of SOA efforts and how SOA is connected to related disciplines such as enterprise architecture, portfolio management, and other approaches to manage IT as a Business and for the Business.

3:15 p.m.

Supporting Web Services: A Balancing Act between Customer Satisfaction and Cost Reduction

Evan Leonard

The distributed nature of SOA makes it challenging for support engineers and developers to easily reproduce and solve problems in Web services and composite applications. Unlike traditional application development, SOAs are iterated continuously as services are created, modified and introduced into the environment. Service consumers and client developers expect Web services to meet certain quality and performance levels while also interoperating properly with other services and value-added tools built around the API — none of which may have originated from the same group, environment, toolkit, or common language. This session spotlights the challenges of providing technical support for Web services and composite applications within SOA deployments. The speaker will offer practical tips to help lighten the burden on support engineers and developers, accelerate problem diagnosis and resolution, and ensure a successful client developer experience. 

4:30 p.m.

DSM: A Bottom-Up Analysis to a Top-Down View of Software Architecture

Neeraj Sangal

Large scale software systems are hard to understand because they contain a multitude of elements from a variety of domains and technologies. In this session, we will show you how low level analysis of software artifacts can be aggregated to produce a high level picture that is both real and intuitive. You will learn a new and highly scalable approach that utilizes inter-module dependencies to represent and visualize the architecture of large systems. A Dependency Structure Matrix (DSM) is used to map elements of the enterprise such as applications, databases, services and frameworks. Additionally, you can then combine these elements together to generate an overall blueprint of how various elements of the enterprise inter-relate with each other. With this map you can identify and fix architectural weaknesses, understand the impact of change and prevent the erosion of architecture as the system evolves.

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

10:30 a.m.

Frankly Speaking:  Frameworks and Their Value in the EA Process

Leonard Fehskens, V.P. and Global Professional Lead, The Open Group

When business and IT develop technology initiatives which align with business strategies business transformation can often be attained. Enterprise architects often lead the charge to transform business – but need the right tools, including frameworks, to successfully implement the enterprise architecture that supports this.

Diverse architecture framework standards have been developed and matured over the past decade. Many engineers believe there is an “either or” decision to be made regarding frameworks, but this is not always the case. Some of these standards address completely different pieces of the architecting process, and in some cases there are natural synergies that can be leveraged between them. The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) has a primary focus on architecting methodology—the “how to” aspect of architecture, without prescribing architecture description constructs. This presentation will address the following:

  • Provide Enterprise and IT Architects with practical advice and a better understanding of frameworks, including TOGAF;
  • Showcase how TOGAF can be leveraged to meet the needs of organizations within varying industries; and
  • Demonstrate key elements required in order to reach a successful conclusion: repeatable methodology, standardized output models, formal validation, governance, collaboration guidelines, configuration management, tools, and patterns.
 
11:45 a.m.

Assuring Performance in Mainframe-based Services

Shawn Bissel, Software Research Architect, Strangeloop Networks &
Kent Alstad, Chief Technology Officer, Strangeloop

Often the motivation for bringing web services into the enterprise is not performance - it’s about interoperability. But performance is NOT optional, without performance, interoperability becomes an exercise in frustration. This session digs into the strategies that an architect can employ in the design web services so that performance is a feature of web services, rather than an obstacle.

2:00 p.m.

SOA Danger Zone: Protecting the Enterprise from the Inherent Architectural Deficiencies of SOA

Paul Lipton, Advisor and Sr. Architect, CA Intellectual Property and Industry Standards Group

Popular assumptions can often be dangerous. As many organizations move towards SOA they are also embracing the idea of delivering enterprise data as a service, often to other services. We will consider how the many unique and highly-regarded architectural characteristics of SOA, such as loose-coupling, can actually be a two-edged sword. This is especially true with data-centric services, which tend to operate at a lower level and often at the highest volumes. New SOBAs (Service Oriented Business Applications) with AJAX-enabled front-ends may even exacerbate this problem further. The success of this new generation of distributed applications requires that one must gain an understanding of the true nature, performance characteristics, and availability of the business transactions that flows in real-time through these highly distributed services and their supporting IT infrastructure. This session will emphasize practical considerations that impact SOA architects, security managers, application support personnel, and designers so that you can be prepared to deliver a verifiably reliable and successful SOA, remediate SOA failures, and reduce risk. We will briefly consider how this maps back to advanced WS-* standards and how they might composed together to solve real world SOA challenges. We may also hazard some speculation about the future.

3:15 p.m.

Optimizing SOA Investment

Steven A. Warner, Ph.D., Technical Director, Northrop Grumman Corporation

SOA is as much or more about integrating an organization’s information technology with its business processes to enable and support agility as it is about new technology or functional design. Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Service Oriented Architecture Community of Practice (SOA CoP) commissioned the SOA-Enablement (SOA-E) workgroup to create process based on an amalgamation of industry best practices including the composite application lifecycle, enterprise architecture, an IT investment process and business process engineering to an organization’s management to decide the optimal project to fund. Based on these concepts, the SOA-E is creating the ID-SOA process to meet this goal. ID-SOA coordinates and formalizes processes and activities most organizations already perform. The presentation will describe how the SOA-E team has met the challenge with this process. It will describe how ID-SOA uses enterprise architectural models of the Federal Enterprise Architecture and the views of the Department of Defense Architecture Framework to enable and support the investment process. This one-hour seminar will outline the concepts of ID-SOA as related to how enterprise architecture can drive investment in SOA to enable the organization optimally to achieve its mission or charter.

4:00 p.m.

Extreme Geographically-Distributed Development: Tips and Tricks

Nada deVeiga, Java Solutions Manager, Parasoft Corporation

While Service Orientated Architectures (SOA) offer a number of benefits to IT organizations, very few enterprise business users have benefited yet. Why?  Partly because SOA projects tend to be long journeys instead of iterative short projects. Also, because new services are typically delivered to users as part of new Web portals or rich internet applications. Unfortunately, these new applications rarely replace or integrate with applications that exist on a users’ desktop. In effect, SOA is further complicating an already complex desktop environment; adding yet another siloed application to the mix.

This presentation will highlight a technology approach that leverages the Windows Communications Foundation (WCF) within the .NET Framework v3.5 to enable rapid integration between legacy applications, including desktop applications, and Web services.